Conceptual Diagrams

Early on in the design process, particularly in projects where space planning is required, we start wtih something that we call conceptual or programming diagrams. It's so fun to think that designers look at a space, then sit down and sketch exactly what we want it to look like when it's finished. That is very rarely the case. The reality of the first drawings is something a bit more like this:

 This is a bubble diagram, the first diagram we generally create once we have listed out all the spaces and their required adjacencies.

This is a bubble diagram, the first diagram we generally create once we have listed out all the spaces and their required adjacencies.

 Once we have a bubble diagram, we lay out "blocks" over the base plan 

Once we have a bubble diagram, we lay out "blocks" over the base plan 

 More complex space planning projects may include an adjacency/criteria diagram. This is our template which has been partially completed for adjacency purposes.

More complex space planning projects may include an adjacency/criteria diagram. This is our template which has been partially completed for adjacency purposes.

There are many more types of concept diagrams that are used for different project types. Not all interior design projects require conceptual diagrams. A renovation of a single space may simply come in the form of notes and a design program... I'll get to that document next! This is a complicated and thorough profession that involves a LOT of time and energy behind the scenes that our clients often never see. Who knew we weren't just doodling ideas all day!

Take a look at some of these great books about conceptual planning and diagramming!

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Rachel WaldronComment